Mong Kok riot girl protected by Taiwan human rights groups

EJ Insight » Hong Kong

It is said that the girl, who fled to Taiwan to escape trial relating to the Mong Kok riot, has not filed any application for political asylum. Photos: Reuters, HKEJ

It is said that the girl, who fled to Taiwan to escape trial relating to the Mong Kok riot, has not filed any application for political asylum. Photos: Reuters, HKEJ

An 18-year-old girl who fled to Taiwan reportedly to avoid trial relating to last year’s Mong Kok riot is under the protection of human rights groups.

Lee Sin-yi has been charged with two counts of rioting and one count of assaulting police in the violence, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reports.

Huang Kuo-chang, chairman of New Power Party, the third biggest political party in Taiwan, said some human rights groups are offering assistance to “a friend from Hong Kong”.

He gave no further details.

An unnamed source told Apple Daily that Lee is safe in Taiwan and that her family members can rest assured.

Lee, who has been issued a warrant for her arrest by a court, asked the party for help after she jumped bail and fled to Taiwan in January, according to reports.

Huang did not confirm whether Lee had sought political asylum in Taiwan.

Meanwhile, Huang’s New Power Party allies and other parties, including some personalities from Hong Kong, announced an alliance called Taiwan Congressional Hong Kong Caucus on Monday.

The alliance aims to push for changes to the regulations governing relations with Hong Kong and Macau so as to provide political asylum for Hongkongers if necessary.

Tu Jia-fen, director of the Hong Kong and Macau department of Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council, which deals with cross-strait affairs, said there has been no application for political asylum from Lee.

Former justice secretary Elsie Leung, deputy director of the NPC Standing Committee’s Basic Law Committee, said she has no comment on what the Taiwan government should do but added the incident will not affect the relationship between Taiwan and Hong Kong.

Leung said the Hong Kong government will do what it has to do, stressing that anyone who breaks the law should be punished.

A director of Taiwan civil group New School for Democracy said he was told that Lee wants to stay in Taiwan because she is worried about what might happen at her trial. She was underage when the Mong Kok riot took place.

Some civil groups in Taiwan are willing to help Lee obtain a senior high school diploma, according to Apple Daily.

– Contact us at english@hkej.com

TL/AC/RA

HK girl being protected by human rights groups in Taiwan after fleeing to avoid Mong Kok riot trial

Lee Sin-yi, an 18-year-old girl who has been charged with two counts of rioting and one count of assaulting police for participating in last year’s unrest, also known as “fishball revolution”, in Mong Kok, is now under non-government protection in Taiwan.

Huang Kuo-chang, chairman of New Power Party, the third biggest political party in Taiwan’s parliament, said on Monday that some Taiwanese human rights groups, to his knowledge, are offering assistance to “a friend from Hong Kong”, referring to Lee, although he does not know any details about the matter, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reported.

An unnamed source also told Apple Daily that Lee is now safe in Taiwan and therefore her family members can rest assured.

Media reported earlier that Lee, who has been issued a warrant for her arrest by a court, asked the party for help after she jumped bail and fled to Taiwan in January.

While Huang did not confirm whether Lee had done so or sought for political asylum in Taiwan, he and 18 of his colleagues in the parliament along with several Hong Kong lawmakers, including Nathan Law and Eddie Chu, announced on Monday to form an alliance called “Taiwan Congressional Hong Kong Caucus” on Monday.

The alliance aims to push for revision of the Regulations Governing the Relations with Hong Kong and Macau so as to provide political asylum for Hongkongers when necessary.

Meanwhile, Tu Jia-fen, director of the Hong Kong and Macau department of Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council, which deals with cross-strait affairs, said there has been no application for political asylum from Lee, stressing that the department will deal with it according to law if such an application is filed.

Asked about the incident, former justice secretary Elsie Leung Oi-sie, who is currently deputy director of the NPC Standing Committee’s Basic Law Committee, said she has no intention to comment on what Taiwan government should do but it is for sure the incident will not affect the relationship between Taiwan and Hong Kong.
Leung believed the Hong Kong government will do what it has to do, stressing that anyone who breaks the law should be punished.

A director of Taiwan’s civil group called New School for Democracy said he was told that Lee wants to stay in Taiwan because the fact that she was underage when the fishball revolution took place in February in 2016 makes her very worried about what will happen in her trial.

It is understood that some civil groups in Taiwan are willing to help Lee gain from a local senior high school a diploma that she has not obtained yet in Hong Kong so far, Apple Daily reported.

– Contact us at english@hkej.com

TL/AC

http://www.ejinsight.com/20170613-mong-kok-riot-girl-protected-by-taiwan-human-rights-groups/

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